Saturday, 1 July 2017

End of June 2017 in the Garden

 The tall flower spikes of the New Zealand Phormium tenax reach high into the sky

Closely followed by the Lilium regale also growing forever upwards
  Phygelius raspberry swirl
The refreshing scent of Lavandula hidcote drifts through the air
This Loquat Tree is a curiosity. When we travelled in the Galician region of Spain several years ago, there was a bowl of loquats on the breakfast table. Inside they had big brown seeds which I saved and carried back home with this result. I wonder if they will ever bear fruit?
 Echinops - Globe thistle will soon be flowering

Clematis Hagley hybrid 

Some of the figs are almost ready but these have still to fatten
I am happy that Californian poppies scatter themselves around - if necessary they are easily removed
Lilium martagon

There are two climbing Hydrangeas growing up our walls - this one is the regular Hydrangea petiolaris
but this one is a rare variety called Hydrangea seemannii. Native to the cloud forests of Mexico and named after the discoverer, Berthold Carl Seeman, a German botanist 1825-1871.
Centaurea montana
Leycesteria formosa - Himalayan honeysuckle
Australian Callistemon citrinus - bottlebrush. There was once a time when this plant would not have survived out of doors in my garden, but with our warmer climate this one has flourished outside for the past 20 years. 

46 comments:

  1. Your garden blooms are lovely. I especially like the two varieties of hydrangea. Your lavender is already in full bloom. I'm waiting for ours to really open up. Some more sunshine would be good too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This afternoon is lovely - hope it is with you too, and that your lavender will soon be in full bloom as well.

      Delete
  2. Dear Rosemary, That is how I like to see flowers...up close and personal. You have a wealth of common and rare plants and flowers in your garden. I loved the story about you saving a seed from the breakfast table, and look at the majesty of the plant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Gina - I know that you like to collect and bring seeds home with you from abroad too - even if the Locquat Tree should fruit, if I remember rightly, their taste is not particularly exciting.

      Delete
  3. What a RIOT of colour! Just beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a colourful time in the garden at the moment, you are right.

      Delete
  4. Your garden is overwhelmingly beautiful. I don't think I've ever heard of a climbing hydrangea. I asked my husband, the Spaniard, if he'd ever eaten a loquat, I haven't, and he said yes and that to him they tasted like a slightly acidic apricot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is a long time ago now that I carried the seeds back home, may be 15years, and I don't recall them being particularly delicious. However, it would be interesting for me if they did fruit.

      Delete
  5. What a wonderful variety you have blooming. Everything looks beautiful and healthy. I look forward to seeing what July brings in your garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More fruit and veg should be ready during July Catherine.

      Delete
    2. I look forward to seeing what it is. Your garden is amazing.

      Delete
  6. Your flowers are so live, that they just jumping out of my computer.
    Wonderful photos and so beautiful flowers.
    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad that you enjoyed seeing them Orvokki.

      Delete
  7. Love your garden, Rosemary! You have such nice plants! I like your New Zealand Phormium tenax. Unfortunately it is not winter hardy in my climate.
    Best wishes,
    Lisa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Lisa - I suspect that the Phormium tenax would not have been able to grow here either, may be 30 years ago.

      Delete
  8. Your garden is wonderful - do you open it to the public? Loquats are quite common here. I find them a bit tasteless and a lot of them is seed but on a very hot day they are refreshing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No I don't open the garden to the public Susan - the spot where I live is not really suitable for parking as we live surrounded by National Trust land.
      My memory of locquats is that they are not particularly tasty, but I would still like the tree to grow some nevertheless.

      Delete
  9. Hello Rosemary, Your garden is enchanting as always. I discovered loquats when I went to Taiwan and immediately recognized them from taste and appearance as a tropical member of the rose family. I thought they needed quite a bit of heat to live--my friend in California has one in her backyard that fruits abundantly; they throw them all away, even though the fruits are sweet as sugar.
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jim - I do believe that you are correct - I can see that the leaves are exactly the same as those on a medlar apple tree which are also members of the Rosaceae family. I am not really bothered about the fruit but would it to grow some for me so that I can see them grow.

      Delete
  10. You have a wonderful garden with a great variety ! I am amazed at how certain plants can survive in the English climate, but as you say , the climate change is probably the reason.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am surprised myself at just what will survive here in my garden.

      Delete
  11. I can't think of anything prettier than your garden...except maybe your photographs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is such a generous comment Janey and I thank you very much

      Delete
  12. I took some cuttings last year of callistemon and, having nowhere else to put them while we were in Australia (ironically!), bunged them into the veggie garden to take their chances. All three survived!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is great Jessica - they should do very well in your sheltered spot.

      Delete
  13. Dear Rosemary - How beautiful, peaceful, and powerful! Your garden looks like a botanical garden with so many various different plants. I especially like the lacy touch of off-white climbing hydrangea and Clematis. In my garden, hydrangeas went withered already. I wonder why Lilium regale doesn’t bend with such big flowers. Thanks for this refreshing sensation. It is hot and humid with 34 degrees C here.

    Yoko

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Yoko - it is surprising that Lilium regale doesn't bend with so many large trumpet flowers to carry on her stalk, but she has a very sturdy stem. I do give the plant a little bit of support too in the form of a cane just to help in case it turns windy. I am pleased that you enjoyed seeing some the different plants growing in our garden during June.

      Delete
  14. Nice set of unusual plants and flowers.You are obviously a very keen gardener to collect seeds from your travels around the world and have a fairly mild climate plus good soil/location to get results like that. I'm impressed. I also travel the globe...by phone... trying in vain to get a reliable broadband service from my current provider :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Bob - sadly our soil could do with being much richer - it relies solely on my husband's compost. We live on oolithic limestone, and putting a plant in the garden requires a hole chiselled out of the limestone and then filled with compost to help it prosper.

      Delete
  15. Beautiful flowers.

    Thank you. Love love, Andrew. Bye.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for visiting Andrew - glad you enjoyed the flowers

      Delete
  16. The Loquat tree looks fasinating, I hope it surprises you one day. Do you have any hints with fig trees do you remove all the fruit in the autumn that hasn't developed? Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't remove the little figs that look as if they have not developed - they are next years crop, and the tiny pea sized ones will crop the year after that.

      Delete
  17. Your garden is filled with wonderful plants, some prosaic (and always beautiful) and other exotic varieties that look so very interesting. We're waiting for our figs to fatten up, as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The garden is at its high summer peak - I don't like the thought that we are now so far into summer though.

      Delete
  18. Absolutely beautiful garden flowers, so of them I've never seen! One can't compete with Mother Nature!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thak you for your kind visit Debra - that is true - all of the different seasons are a testament to Mother Nature.

      Delete
  19. Dearest Rosemary,
    Wow, you live almost in Paradise!
    Such a lush garden with healthy, happy plants that reward you generously with lots of blooms.
    You did/do what we always loved to do; bringing seeds home and trying anything.
    We are not as fortunate as you are due to our very poor soil condition and also extremes as we once (in our 33 years so far) had -17°C during Christmas. In a couple of days from 27°C to -17°C and hardly any plant can handle such a shock!
    But I do enjoy it when I see it and it is always rewarding to come here!
    Sending you hugs,
    Mariette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Mariette - our soil is actally not good as we live on oolithic limestone. My husband pick axes out a hole in the limestone and then fills it with his own compost. However,over the years the plants have flourished well - we certainly do not have extremes of weather to contend with like you do.
      Glad you enjoyed seeing the garden flowers, always a pleasure to see you here.

      Delete
  20. You should write a gardening book. I wish I knew how to produce such wonderful blooms

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My husband thinks the secret is his homemade compost - but I think that our stone walls and high hedges form an evironment that they like.

      Delete
  21. you are outstanding in your gardening skills my friend and your photography is remarkable!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much Baili - I really appreciate your kind comment.

      Delete
  22. Rosemary, it is a very long time since I visited your page. I am thrilled to see you are still posting such fabulous images... as always, beautiful.
    Fondest wishes
    Jx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really lovely to hear from you again Janice - yes, I am still here, and so far haven't disappeared just yet.

      Delete

❖PLEASE NOTE❖ Comments made by those who hide their identity will be deleted

“You can't stay in your corner of the forest waiting for others to come to you - you have to go to them sometimes”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh